Study – Exchanges of Personal Data After the Schrems II Judgment – 08-07-2021

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, examines reforms to the legal framework for the exchange of personal and other data between the EU and the USA that would be necessary to ascertain that the requirements of EU law are satisfied and that the rights of EU citizens are respected, following the Schrems II judgment of the EU Court of Justice.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

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Highlights – Adding gender-based violence as new ‘eurocrime’: committee vote – Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs – Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality

Stop violence against women
The Committees on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs, and on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality will vote on the report on identifying gender-based violence as a new area of ‘eurocrime’, on 14 July. This legislative initiative requests the Commission to propose a Council decision to consider gender-based violence as an area of crime that meets the criteria established under Article 83(1) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU).

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

In-Depth Analysis – Regulating targeted and behavioural advertising in digital services. How to ensure users’ informed consent. – 01-07-2021

The study addresses the regulation of targeted and behavioural advertising in the context of digital services. Marketing methods and technologies deployed in behavioural and target advertising are presented. The EU law on consent to the processing of personal data is analysed, in connection with advertising practices. Ways of improving the quality of consent are discussed as well as ways of restricting its scope as a legal basis for the processing of personal data.
This study is commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI Committee.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

Study – Biometric Recognition and Behavioural Detection Assessing the ethical aspects of biometric recognition and behavioural detection techniques with a focus on their current and future use in public spaces – 06-08-2021

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the JURI and PETI Committees, analyses the use of biometric techniques from an ethical and legal perspective. Biometric techniques raise a number of specific ethical issues, as an individual cannot easily change biometric features, and as these techniques tend to intrude into the human body and ultimately the human self. Further issues are more generally associated with large-scale surveillance, algorithmic decision making, or profiling. The study analyses different types of biometric techniques and draws conclusions for EU legislation.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

Highlights – Intimate partner violence and custody rights: committee vote – Committee on Legal Affairs – Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality

Child on a table with parents in the background
The Committees on Legal Affairs and on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality will vote on a joint report regarding the impact of intimate partner violence and custody rights on women and children, on 13 July. The draft calls on the Member States to urgently address the issue by guaranteeing the safety and economic independence to victims by means of access to specific housing, essential public services, and professional psychological support.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

Briefing – European Union data challenge – 28-07-2021

The exponential growth and importance of data generated in industrial settings have attracted the attention of policymakers aiming to create a suitable legal framework for its use. While the term ‘industrial data’ has no clear definition, such data possess certain distinctive characteristics: they are a subset of big data collected in a structured manner and within industrial settings; they are frequently proprietary and contain various types of sensitive data. The GDPR rules remain of great relevance for such data, as personal data is difficult to be filtered out from mixed datasets and anonymisation techniques are not always effective. The current and planned rules relevant for B2B sharing of industrial data exhibit many shortcomings. They lack clarity on key issues (e.g. mixed datasets), increase the administrative burden for companies, yet not always provide the data protection that businesses need. They do not provide an additional value proposition for B2B data sharing and hinder it in some cases. While this situation warrants policy intervention, both the instrument and its content should be carefully considered. Instead of a legal instrument, soft law could clarify the existing rules; model terms and conditions could be developed and promoted and data standardisation and interoperability efforts supported.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

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