Ambitious R&I investment will enable aviation to move towards climate neutrality [Promoted content]

Bold investment is needed to steer aviation firmly on a course towards climate neutrality by 2050, Clean Sky’s Spring Event, Clean Aviation for a Competitive Green Recovery in Europe, heard on 22 April 2021. Axel Krein is the Executive Director…

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Study – Research for TRAN Committee – The aviation and maritime sectors and the EU-ETS System: challenges and impacts – 09-07-2021

This paper gives an initial overview of the market structure in a revised EU ETS for the European aviation and maritime sectors. Key design options like the scheme’s geographical scope, the baseline year(s), cap and allocation of allowances, and – in the case of aviation – the relationship with CORSIA, can have impacts on the competitive situation of EU carriers and vessels. This is the first stage in the research project focusing on the implementation and socio-economic perspectives related to the eventual inclusion of aviation and maritime in the EU ETS system. The analysis of the Commission’s proposal is expected to follow in fall 2021.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

Highlights – EU leadership in the fight against famines: committee debate – Committee on Development

The Executive Director of the World Food Programme David Beasley with people in Yemen
The Committee on Development will discuss the global humanitarian and food security situation with UN World Food Programme Executive Director David Beasley, on 13 July. According to the latest Global Report on Food Crises, the number of people facing acute food insecurity and needing urgent assistance hit a five-year high in 2020. The debate will feed into the Committee’s work on an upcoming report on food security in developing countries.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

In-Depth Analysis – Recovery and Resilience Dialogue with the European Commission 14 July 2021 – 13-07-2021

Executive Vice-President Dombrovskis and Commissioner Gentiloni have been invited to the second Recovery and Resilience Dialogue under the Recovery and Resilience Facility Regulation. This briefing addresses the following subjects: the Recovery and Resilience Facility and its scrutiny; the state of play of adoption and assessment of the Recovery and Resilience plans; the European Parliament resolutions on the Recovery and Resilience Facility; the financing of national Recovery and Resilience plans and some data on the current economic situation and estimates on the impact of Facility.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

Briefing – Understanding delegated and implementing acts – 07-07-2021

Law-making by the executive is a phenomenon that exists not only in the European Union (EU) but also in its Member States, as well as in other Western liberal democracies. Many national legal systems differentiate between delegated legislation − adopted by the executive and having the same legal force as parliamentary legislation − and purely executive acts −aimed at implementing parliamentary legislation, but that may neither supplement nor modify it. In the EU, the distinction between delegated acts and implementing acts was introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon. The distinction, laid down in Articles 290 and 291 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), seems clear only at first sight. Delegated acts are defined as non-legislative acts of general application, adopted by the European Commission on the basis of a delegation contained in a legislative act. They may supplement or amend the basic act, but only as to non-essential aspects of the policy area. In contrast, implementing acts are not defined as to their legal nature, but to their purpose − where uniform conditions for implementing legally binding Union acts are needed. Under no circumstances may an implementing act modify anything in the basic act. Delegated acts differ from implementing acts in particular with regard to the procedural aspects of their adoption − the former after consulting Member States’ experts, but their view is not binding; the latter in the comitology procedure, where experts designated by the Member States, sitting on specialised committees, can object to a draft implementing act. In the case of delegated acts, however, the Parliament and Council can introduce, in the delegation itself, a right to object to a draft act or even to revoke the delegation altogether. Both delegated and implementing acts are subject to judicial review by the Court of Justice of the EU which controls their conformity with the basic act.

Source : © European Union, 2021 – EP

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